Chilling Trends: Millions of Brits Brave Freezing Homes to Beat Soaring Energy Costs

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Key Takeaways:

  • A recent report by clean energy-tech company, Aira, reveals that Brits are turning down their home heating in response to rising energy prices and the cost of living.
  • Approximately 65% of Brits are considering or have already decided to reduce their heating this January, with 7% willing to turn it off completely.
  • As high energy prices place financial pressures on households, many are willing to endure record low temperatures indoors, with the average Brit ready to brave temperatures as cold as 11.3°C before turning on the heating.

Subtitle: A Cold Start to 2024: Brits Embrace Thermal Thriftiness Amidst Energy Price Surge

As the New Year dawns, a chilling resolve has swept across the UK, with millions of Brits opting for Thermal Thriftiness, a money-saving trend aimed at combating the surging costs of home heating. A recent social attitudes survey commissioned by Aira, a Swedish clean-energy company, sheds light on this frosty phenomenon, showcasing how Brits are willing to endure record low temperatures indoors to counter escalating energy bills.

Cold Comfort: Brits Embrace Thermal Thriftiness

The study conducted by Aira reveals that 64% of respondents have committed to lowering their home heating during the first month of the year, and a daring 7% have chosen to go the extra mile by turning off their heating entirely. Despite the prospect of a severe January cold snap, millions of Brits are steadfast in their resolve to keep home heating expenses low.

A Winter of Resilience

The survey results indicate that this trend may extend well into 2024, as more than a third (36%) of participants express their intention to maintain lower-than-normal indoor temperatures even into late February. This commitment to enduring cold conditions is driven by the desire to combat financial pressures, as 76% of respondents identify high energy prices as a primary concern.

Innovative Strategies to Stay Warm

In response to surging energy costs, Brits are adopting creative strategies to stay warm without cranking up the thermostat. Approximately 68% are willing to don dressing gowns, while 67% opt for cozy slippers, and 66% pile on extra layers. In addition, 65% are resorting to extra socks before succumbing to the temptation of turning on the heating. Surprisingly, some respondents are even donning outdoor clothes, such as hats and coats, indoors to fend off the cold.

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Sacrifices and Cost-Cutting Measures

The financial challenges posed by high energy prices have led to sacrifices in other areas of life. One in four (25%) Brits has pledged to spend less on food this year to allocate more funds for heating costs. Similarly, 22% intend to cut back on clothing expenses, and 24% are reducing leisure activities to balance their budgets. Furthermore, 9% are seeking warmth in heated public spaces, like libraries and cafes, to avoid adjusting their home thermostats, and 3% have even resorted to moving in with family to save on heating costs.

The Clean Energy Solution: Heat Pumps

In response to the growing need for alternative home energy solutions, 11% of Brits, totaling over 5.8 million individuals, are considering the installation of a heat pump in 2024. Heat pumps have emerged as the leading home energy solution in countries like Sweden, known for its harsh winters. These devices provide reliable, clean energy for homes, significantly reducing CO2 emissions and heating bills.

While 130 million European households still rely on gas and oil boilers for heating, the transition to heat pumps could be a game-changer. In the UK alone, 25 million households use gas and oil boilers, contributing to 16% of the nation’s total CO2 emissions.

Martin Lewerth, Aira Group Chief Executive Officer, emphasizes the importance of electrifying residential heating, stating, “Switching from a gas boiler to a heat pump will help families save 25% on their heating bills and reduce household emissions by at least 75% – a number that rises to 100% with fossil-free energy – without requiring any lifestyle changes.”

As Brits brave the cold to save on energy costs, the adoption of clean energy solutions like heat pumps offers a promising path to more efficient, sustainable, and cost-effective heating.

Key Takeaways:

  • A recent report by clean energy-tech company, Aira, reveals that Brits are turning down their home heating in response to rising energy prices and the cost of living.
  • Approximately 65% of Brits are considering or have already decided to reduce their heating this January, with 7% willing to turn it off completely.
  • As high energy prices place financial pressures on households, many are willing to endure record low temperatures indoors, with the average Brit ready to brave temperatures as cold as 11.3°C before turning on the heating.
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Subtitle: A Cold Start to 2024: Brits Embrace Thermal Thriftiness Amidst Energy Price Surge

As the New Year dawns, a chilling resolve has swept across the UK, with millions of Brits opting for Thermal Thriftiness, a money-saving trend aimed at combating the surging costs of home heating. A recent social attitudes survey commissioned by Aira, a Swedish clean-energy company, sheds light on this frosty phenomenon, showcasing how Brits are willing to endure record low temperatures indoors to counter escalating energy bills.

Cold Comfort: Brits Embrace Thermal Thriftiness

The study conducted by Aira reveals that 64% of respondents have committed to lowering their home heating during the first month of the year, and a daring 7% have chosen to go the extra mile by turning off their heating entirely. Despite the prospect of a severe January cold snap, millions of Brits are steadfast in their resolve to keep home heating expenses low.

A Winter of Resilience

The survey results indicate that this trend may extend well into 2024, as more than a third (36%) of participants express their intention to maintain lower-than-normal indoor temperatures even into late February. This commitment to enduring cold conditions is driven by the desire to combat financial pressures, as 76% of respondents identify high energy prices as a primary concern.

Innovative Strategies to Stay Warm

In response to surging energy costs, Brits are adopting creative strategies to stay warm without cranking up the thermostat. Approximately 68% are willing to don dressing gowns, while 67% opt for cozy slippers, and 66% pile on extra layers. In addition, 65% are resorting to extra socks before succumbing to the temptation of turning on the heating. Surprisingly, some respondents are even donning outdoor clothes, such as hats and coats, indoors to fend off the cold.

Sacrifices and Cost-Cutting Measures

The financial challenges posed by high energy prices have led to sacrifices in other areas of life. One in four (25%) Brits has pledged to spend less on food this year to allocate more funds for heating costs. Similarly, 22% intend to cut back on clothing expenses, and 24% are reducing leisure activities to balance their budgets. Furthermore, 9% are seeking warmth in heated public spaces, like libraries and cafes, to avoid adjusting their home thermostats, and 3% have even resorted to moving in with family to save on heating costs.

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The Clean Energy Solution: Heat Pumps

In response to the growing need for alternative home energy solutions, 11% of Brits, totaling over 5.8 million individuals, are considering the installation of a heat pump in 2024. Heat pumps have emerged as the leading home energy solution in countries like Sweden, known for its harsh winters. These devices provide reliable, clean energy for homes, significantly reducing CO2 emissions and heating bills.

While 130 million European households still rely on gas and oil boilers for heating, the transition to heat pumps could be a game-changer. In the UK alone, 25 million households use gas and oil boilers, contributing to 16% of the nation’s total CO2 emissions.

Martin Lewerth, Aira Group Chief Executive Officer, emphasizes the importance of electrifying residential heating, stating, “Switching from a gas boiler to a heat pump will help families save 25% on their heating bills and reduce household emissions by at least 75% – a number that rises to 100% with fossil-free energy – without requiring any lifestyle changes.”

As Brits brave the cold to save on energy costs, the adoption of clean energy solutions like heat pumps offers a promising path to more efficient, sustainable, and cost-effective heating.


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